click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
CSPAN 39
MSNBCW 28
CNNW 21
CSPAN2 16
MSNBC 12
FBC 9
KQED (PBS) 8
CNN 6
KRCB (PBS) 6
KTVU (FOX) 5
KCSM (PBS) 4
LINKTV 4
KGO (ABC) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 217
French 3
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 221 (some duplicates have been removed)
it was harsh. how about those people who lied to the congress that represents the people about the nsa activities and bold faced lies saying they did not spy on americans? that is all i have to say. what you think about the sentence to reprimanding and what others would do if they provide that type of information? those in the future might provide this type of information to the public as well? caller: i would like to echo the previous gentleman's comments, and that is they did take an oath. at what point does your --scious do the right thing it is really a tough question. he did break his oath. at the same time, at what point is there a point when you should break the oath when it is for the greater good? >> usa today reflects hemlines and other papers. nsa admits new privacy violations. kevin johnson writing about the top intelligence officials here yen . there are other accounts of the story as well. theheard some thoughts on 35-year sentence handed down. you could make your thoughts known as well. kentucky up next. archie on the independent line. good morning. personally i think th
later when the nsa program has expanded so much. sideyou want allies on our , standing firm against islamic terrorism, after the president says the war is almost over -- i support the nsa program. we went through the nuances. apart from the isolationist the blameart from america first crowd in congress, one of the main reasons why we have a hard time maintaining support for programs such as the nsa is because the president has undercut us. he speaks in a schizophrenic way. he should be the one out there on national television. he should be the one of there, instead of talking about phony scandals, he should be talking about the speeches he has made about islamic terrorism and tell us why the nsa program is so important. [applause] we are up against a situation where people considered republicans or conservatives are defending a program of left of center president refuses to defend it himself. the country has to come first. that is why i believe a program such as the nsa, that as the basis for today's program, is so essential. let me talk about privacy versus security. menace of comm
, the nsa's own internal audit reveals the agency has broken its own privacy rules and overstepped its legal authority thousands of times a year. then we go to cairo where the muslim brotherhood has called for a day of rage after more than 600 people were killed on wednesday. >> the one thing people will not stand for in the long term is to have this kind of regressive security state inflicted upon them. once the targets of this authoritarian apparatus moves away from the islamists and starts imposing itself on other parts of egyptian society, then perhaps,e might see, once again a popular uprising against that kind of crackdown. >> we will speak with sharif abdel kouddous in cairo and p.j. crowley, former state department spokesperson, who is called for the u.s. to suspend military aid to egypt and call the ouster of mohamed morsi a coup. then, didn't eight-year-old spy for america? we look at how u.s. allies in yemen used a child the place electronic chips on the man he considered to be his surrogate father. days later, the man was killed in u.s. drone strike. all of that and more coming u
of the nsa had actually caused inconvenience, damage, harm to un-american. i have not seen that story yet. wasve not seen a person who wrongfully identified to be a terrorist, was thrown in jail, given the fifth degree, and so on. there has been more inconvenience and damage to americans by the no-fly list and by taking shoes off in an airport then buy this program, which is precisely pointed toward finding people who pose threats to the united states, see who they are talking to, follow them up under court supervision to identify threats. stuff, this is potential we do not trust the government having information stuff. it is not real harm caused to real people by activities which are causing no good. >> i am not going to debate this, because i am not supposed to be the debater appear. but i am going to play devils advocate with you you. let us put it that way. i will take full accountability for that for our audience here and on the webcast. there are two things i would push you on. one is, how would you know if anyone had been harmed by abuse, given that the program is as secret as it i
>> coming up, concern growing over the expansion of nsa surveillance since the war on terror started. employees were spying on their lovers. the agency was spying on uniteded nations. and that's just what we found out over the weekend. we'll speak with a former agent turned whistleblower ahead. the conflict in syria may have reached a boiling point. secretary of state john kerry says he has no doubt they used chemical weapons on civilians. is intervention inevitable? and speaking of chemical weapons, a new report details how the u.s. once held saddam hussein and the iraqis with its chemical weapons attacks on iranian troops. ♪ tens of thousands gathered at the nation's capital this weekend in remembrance of the 1963 march on washington. even though the nation has come a very long way, many feel that the struggle for martin luther king's dream still continues. more on the sights and sounds later in today's show. it's monday, august 26. pam 5 p.m. in washington, d.c. the national security agency was once the most secretive organization in the u.s. now, hardly a day goes by wh
. >>> the story of egypt takes a dark turn, and the nsa story takes another turn. today -- >> we want egypt to succeed. we want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous egypt. that's our interest. >> american values and american interests. the u.s. may have to choose. we talk with senator john mccain just back from egypt. >>> then, mistakes were made. new revelations about privacy violations at the national security agency. who is watching the watchers? congressman chris van hollen and justin amash join us. and -- >> we want them to look back and say, this is when the rnc got it right. >> republicans reboot in boston and hillary sets up a speaking tour. hello, 2016. our powerhouse political panel sorts it out. then -- the new orleans saints, the oakland raiders and a first down for the girl from pascagoula. an update on sarah thomas. i'm crowley, and this is "state of the union." >>> after days of deadly violence across the country, egypt's interim government is asking the world to listen to its side of the story. members of the foreign ministry released video today of the recent chaos and blamed
newspaper reveals how he was pressured to destroy files he received from nsa whistleblower edward snowden. the top stories this hour. a look back at the top stories from the last seven days, and the latest on rt. damascus has given you when inspectors access to a site of an alleged chemical attack. the u.s. says it is nearly certain the assad government carried this out, a serious response alongside its ally, the uk. >> damascus has agreed to allow the u.n. access to the scene of the alleged attack, but while damascus says it will do its maximum to assure the safety of passage of the investigators, the actual territory is held, so ultimately, it will be the rebel forces who determine whether or not the you when inspectors have the access that they require. it is said that this now comes to old late. . we are hearing from the u.n. that they will, regardless, begin their investigation on moday. the united states has very little doubt that damascus was behind this chemical strike, and the intelligence is basing these claims on the number of reported deaths. we are hearing upwards of 100 peop
to embassies or consulates. >> very frightening, jon, and thank you to you. >>> and while the nsa helped uncover this latest terror threat, there are also new revelations this morning in the controversy over its secret surveillance programs. glenn greenwald from "the guardian" newspaper has been at the center of all this breaking the story with his interview with edward snowden, and he joins us now from brazil. good morning, glenn. you're reporting there are new frustrations, frustrations in congress about being thwarted in attempts to exercise oversight. what does that mean, and who is stopping them? >> members of congress, members from both political parties actually came to us and showed us all kinds of letters and e-mails that they've been exchanging in which they're trying to get the most basic information about what the nsa is doing and spying on american citizens and what the fisa court has been doing in terms of declaring some of this illegal, some of it legal. remember, we keep hearing that there's all kinds of robust oversight by congress and we need not worry and yet these mem
king of new york. and the former c.i.a. and n.s.a. director general, michael hayden. plus, what's next for u.s.-russia relations now that the president has canceled his upcoming meeting with president putin? we'll have analysis from raj rajaratnam of the "washington post." eric schmitt of the "new york times." and cbs news state department correspondent margaret brennan. and we'll look at another story that rocked washington, the sale of the "washington post". we'll talk about the future of newspapers with former "washington post" editor len downie. former "new york times" editor bill keller. and john harris, editor in chief of politico. there's a lot to cover, but this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again, michael hayden who served as both the c.i.a. and n.s.a. director now consulted for the cherdov group here in washington, joins us as our lead guest this morning. general, the president made that news conference on friday, and he said the american people need to know m
, and the nsa story takes another turn. today -- >> we want egypt to succeed. we want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous egypt. that's our interest. >> american values and american interests. the u.s. may have to choose. we talk with senator john mccain just back from egypt. >>> then, mistakes were made. new revelations about privacy violations at the national security agency. who is watching the watchers? and -- >> we want them to look back and say, this is when the rnc got it right. >> republicans reboot in boston and hillary sets up a speaking tour. hello, 2016. our powerhouse political panel sorts it out. then -- the new orleans saints, the oakland raiders and a first down for the girl from pascagoula. an update on sarah thomas. i'm candy crowley, and this is "state of the union." >>> a new message to row tes pr tos. there is room for everyone. we want to go to cnn's nick paton walsh. nick, tell us about this message and do you see it as a warning or a conciliatory gesture? >> reporter: i think it's important to put it in context. it's in a broader speech in which he makes it clear the a
bombshell rocking the nsa. new reports reveal the intelligence agency violated privacy rules thousands of times since 2008. >>> plus a "day of rage" sweeping across egypt today. at least 17 people dead already as thousands take to the streets in response to the bloody crack down early they are week that killed 600. >>> and a new book blowing some holes in the age-old rules of pregnancy. are alcohol and caffeine really off limits? it's all "happening now." jon: but we begin on this friday morning with stunning new developments in the nsa spying scandal. new reports the intelligence agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since 2008. good morning to you, i'm jon scott. >> i'm allison cam rot tax in for general that lee. jon: mice to have you here. >> we have a lot of news, because details come from nsa leaker edward snowden. he shared them with the "washington post." we have infractions was unauthorized surveillance of u.s. citizens. >> a lot of what happens in the agency, even the nsa is reflection of the culture they see from the
. question to my storingo who favor the of data records out of the nsa and allowing them to sandy phone companies. stay in the phone companies heard what weight do you give the factor we have such a litigious society that it is very easy for someone to go into judge,nd get a left-wing if you will, who will give a say , on injunction, and thus prevent the immediate availability of that information if it were allowed to be -- to remain in the phone company hands? there is a session court to up for that. you are dealing with just the fisa court, a judge -- >> you are talking while it is in the possession of the government, the nsa gecko what i'm talking about is -- the nsa? what i'm talking about is the dy made, taking it out of the nsa possession, allowing it to remain in five years in a phone company's possession. you're taking it out of and putting it into the civil courts, where the phone company is a subject to an injunction. >> general alexander and others in the nsa have discussed this. they have no philosophical problem with the phone company holding onto the records. again, their
earlier this year, so he still faces the possibility of being returned to jail. >>> the nsa surveillance network can reportedly see about 75% of all u.s. internet traffic. this is according to this report out today in the "wall street journal." they've been investigating. so this report says that the nsa sometimes keeps the content of e-mails between u.s. citizens and then filters some domestic phone calls that use internet connections. the nsa has recently stated that it only, and their word is touches, touches 1.6% of the world's internet data. john jo joe johns, let me bring you in on this one from washington. what does this "wall street journal" report tell us as far as how the nsa is filtering e-mail and internet traffic? >> it sounds like nsa has a second shot. some of this we already knew. the nsa asks the telecommunications companies, brooke, to give it streams of traffic that the telecom company reasonably believes to contain foreign intelligence information. by the way, that's not everything that happens on the internet or on telephones. but it's still a lot of information. the
to pounce on this nsa mess to see how the heck it got messy. what we did not tell you is that it would take 60 days to find out. ♪ neil: all right. good news on this whole nsa mess. in 60 days, 60 days, we'll get to the bottom of this, 60 days. that's how long we have to wait to hear from the president's so-called surveillance panel to release initial findings, 60 days. imagine how much could happen in that time. why, look what happened in the last 60 days. on the heels the government collected 115 million americans phone records, we heard they were demanding and getting billions of e-mails from every major online site out there; then news that the nsa had 75% of all internet traffic under its watch, reports later that courts slapped the nsa more than a few times for this kind of overreach over just the last few years; then snooping on phone calls made abroad, phone calls from abroad, and nsa snoops spying on girlfriends, later explained it's just a few snoops on just a few girlfriends, and that's just in the lass 60 days. can you imagine what we'll discover in the next 60 days? the hills
you. >> woodruff: still to come on the newshour: overreach at the n.s.a.; a planet-hunter goes dark; opening up a pristine rain forest to oil drilling; shields and brooks on the week's news; plus, harper and musslewhite on playing the blues. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> reporter: the number of dead in thursday's car bombing in beirut, lebanon, went up at least 22 today, with more than 300 wounded. it was the deadliest attack there in nearly three decades, engulfing a busy street in fire and smoke. the site is near a complex where the shiite militant group hezbollah holds rallies. today, the group's leader, sheikh hassan nasrallah, blamed sunni radicals. he pledged to double the number of hezbollah forces helping fight sunni rebels in syria. a sudden wave of refugees from syria is pouring into northern iraq. u.n. refugee officials reported today that many come from aleppo, syria's largest city, and their numbers approach 8,000 a day. they've been crossing at a new bridge over the tigris river. there already are more than 150,000 syrian refugees regist
audit and some other documents. >> reporter: that paper work shows the nsa broke privacy rules. since congress gave the surveillance agency new broader powers in 2008. nsa leaker edward ♪ den gave the washington post documents earlier this summer including an nsa audit dated may of 2012. it shows ore the prior year there were nearly 2800 incidents of unauthorized collection of distribution of legally protected communications. the nsa audit says many incidents were unintended but the washington post article points out nor serious incidents including violation of a court order and unauthorized use of data on 3,000 americans and green card holders. nsa official told the washington post the nsa is human run agency and at times workers find themselves on the wrong side of the line. california senator dianne fine stain chairs the committee. her reaction to the latest developments on nsa overreach coming up at 6:15. live in washington kyla campbell ktvu channel 2 news. >>> the website of the washington post was hacked which supports the president of syria. the syrian electronic army hacked
to nsa to crack them, if they had access to the emails. so is that what is going on here? the nsa is trying to get all of this information. but then it brings up a thought, why shut it down if they can still get it from you if you still have it? >> i'm walking a very fine line here without divulging what exactly transpired, but i was trying to prevent future transgressions. i have always been comfortable turning over to the government whatever information i have about a specific user. >> right. you have been subpoenaed on a few occasions, a couple of dozen subpoenas, and in those cases you didn't feel because there were individual people and there were reasons you granted those and -- and -- and -- you accepted the subpoenas and gave over the information. >> yeah, and going forward because i still have access to the data, i could be forced to do the same thing with a particular account. like i said before this was a question of access. should our federal government have access to private systems? to conduct surveillance on people without any kind of review? >> what about the argum
. >>> the leaks keep on coming. today "the washington post" published a secret internal audit revealing the nsa violated privacy rules thousands of times. that was just over a one-year period. this comes just a week after the president promised new steps to protect the public and make surveillance programs more transparent. according to the documents obtained by "the post," the audit found more than 2700 violations. the agency claims that number is above average and blames a change in technology for the problems. okay. meanwhile, the white house so far has declined to comment on this newest report, but we're told they were aware of it prior to be its publication. you know who is ready to comment on it? our friend perry bacon, political editor for "the grio." when i look at these leaks from snowden and the national conversation and the nsa forced to say we're going to make changes, haven't really made that many changes, but they're forced to say we're going to make change, we're going to put our cards on the table, as well as 90% of the private contractors, people who do what edward snowden used
does. whether nsa used one of its programs that's come under criticism, xkeystroke or prism of others, obviously we don't know. i can tell you going forward knowing there's a threat out there, these are exactly the kinds of programs that we should be using to gather data from a wide variety of sources. >> yes. >> to sift through it, to try to find those needles in the hay stack before they strike. >> thank you, ambassador bolton. we won't speculate on how the details came. we'll just be glad that it's being monitored. thanks for joining us. we are taking this very seriously. we're considering our coverage on the al qaeda terror threat all day on fox news. keep it here for all the latest breaking developments. kelly? >>> iran is swearing in its newly elected president. in a ceremony broadcast live on state television. change in power raising new questions now about the future of the country's nuclear program. gunner powell li connor powell live from our mideast bureau. what does it mean for us? >> reporter: iran's new president hasan rouhani was elected a month ago. he draws support fr
with russian president putin. it is in retribution to russia's decision to grant asylum to nsa security leaguer edward snowden. it is also first-rate with rush on an array of other issues including missile defense and human rights. says obama still plans to attend the g 20 summit, but a one-on-one meeting with president putin has been postponed. president obama will also at a stop in sweden to his early september travel itinerary. in a statement today, senator schumer, democrat of new york, praised the cancellation. "the president clearly made the right decision, president putin is acting like a schoolyard bully and he does not deserve the respect of a bilateral summit." the president is in california today. he appeared on the "tonight show" with jay leno tonight. he will be visiting troops at the marine corps base. we will bring you the president of the remarks live starting at 3:50 eastern here on c-span. >> ladies intimate, the secretary of state john kerry, and shaun casey, and the executive director of the white ande office of faith-based partnerships, melissa. [applause] >> thank you. tha
it is not a smoke screen to help the nsa. >> we critize them for doing too little and now critize for too much. the worldwide alert is warranted in this situation. >> last week the al-qaeda leader called for attacks. the second 14 minute tape was posted on the internet on friday and marks the 15 year anniversary of al-qaeda's first attack. the si multiapous embassy bombings in tanzanyia. and the focus of the terrorist threat remains in yemen and why the british and french closed the embassy in yemen for the coming days. >> thank you, gen. >> gen mentioned, the focus is on yemen and a known hot bed of activity for al-qaeda. >> it is short for al-qaeda in the araban peninsula. it is considered to be the most dangerous al-qaeda affiliate. it is blamed for several terrorist plots in the united states. and including the bombing attempt on an airliner on christmas day. another plot involving bombs described as printer cartridges. that was broken up thanks for a tip from saudi intelligence officials. they are thought to have influenced the fort hood shotter hassan that left 13 killed and dozens more
roughneck 36. who else thinks the recent terrace is based -- is just propaganda to justify the nsa spying program? let me throw that over to the panel. does anybody believe this could be a counterplay to justify what has been said and done about edward snowden? the first person to speak will get the floor. >> >> is this something that comes to mind. >> i want to go back to the u.s. at some point. it would be a clever way to do it. you can have a real threat and at the same time you can overreact. to make people understand it is not done by a big bad government that wants to control everything, but it is linked to a real threat and real issues and real interest from an american point of view. >> the europeans will be involved for their own interests. we should not criticize the u.s. for doing something we would like to do ourselves. >> france has been engaged in similar activities and may be gone a little bit further. maybe people were surprised by the scale they were. people i know said we know this was going on anyway. is that something that might have occurred to you, that what was reve
the nsa keeps tabs on us, but there's anger behind the escapes that we're not using this spy tools widely enough. the time quotes intelligence experts who say other government agencies want access to all the secret information the nsa selected. let's take you to the judge. senior judicial analyst, judge andrew napolitano. >> at first the government toldes when snowden made his initial revelations the only thing they captured was basic information, billing information,. who you called, when you called, how long you spoke. >> shepard: they lied to us. >> snowden and other nsa whistle-blowers, including one named thomas drake who has been on shows in this building, was prosecuted by the government, and the prosecution was thrown out. reveals the government does have the context of phone calls and e-mails and can read them. this morning we learn that other entities in the federal government are jealous that the nsa has this and they want it. but the dea revealed, the drug enforcement administration, it has received it. so, they have actually started criminal investigations based on informatio
.s. embassies. on friday president obama announced proposals to change the oversight and transparency of the nsa. speakers included congressman peter king who chairs the homeland security subcommittee on counterterrorism and intelligence, former new york times reporter judith miller and fox business network host john stossel. the event was cohosted by the manhattan institute, the weekly standard and the group concerned veterans for america. >> we want to thank you all for coming. i'm not normally intimidated when i speak at these events, but now that i didn't realize gunny sergeant duff was here, now i'm very worried. [laughter] it's great to have all of you. i also want to join in thanking those of you who serve for your service and to say how pleased i am that pete king and john stossel have agreed to be here and also judy miller and gary bernstein who will be joining us for the panel. pete, when i saw -- i saw pete in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people looking around for about a week in late 2011, and pete had volunteered, reuped and gone to afghanistan then to help train the
's decision to grant nsa leaker edward snowden asylum. so are we headed toward a modern-day cold war between these two? >> i was disappointed because, you know, even though we don't have an extradition treaty with them, traditionally we have tried to respect if there's a lawbreaker or an alleged lawbreaker in their country. there have been times where they slipped back into cold war thinking and a cold war mentality. what i consistently say to them and what i say to president putin is that's the past. you know e we've got to think about the future. >> mean tiemt, many are expecting more revelations from snowden related to u.s. surveillance programs. administration officials say those very programs helped uncover this latest terror threat, a potential al qaeda plot in the middle east. about a dozen and a half u.s. embassies and consulates are still closed, a precaution taken in response to that intelligence. critics of the government secrecy says the reports of this plot say snowden's leaks are adding transparency without undermining the successful spying operations. in his first public comme
from edward snowden. the report shows the nsa broke privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of time each year since congress gave the surveillance agency proud, new powers in 2008. "the washington post" says they got a response from an official saying the nsa is a human-run agencies and often times workers find themselves on the wrong side of the line. president obama had a panel of outside intelligence advisers. but that panel of 14 is now down to four people and the white house says last week it's turning to brand-new, and still undetermined outside experts to look over the nsa's actions. there is a special court that's designated to oversee these surveillance agencies. how the nsa went against court orders -- when i see you at 8:15. kyla campbell, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> there's new developments surrounding snoerden. he's accused of downloading materials about u.s. and british spying programs while he was working last year for dell. intelligence agencies say he left dell for a government contractor in march to specifically get access to more top-event files. in
new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good morning to you, with us today, is arthel neville. in for jenna lee. arthel: we'll start with this, jon. a-team of u.n. inspectors coming under sniper fire in damascus. a spokesman saying it happened while they were on their way to inspect the site where hundreds of people were killed in a reported chemical attack last week. for days syria wouldn't let the team go near the site. the government finally agreeing to allow the inspectors to visit that starting today but a senior u.s. official dismissed the offer as too late to be credible saying crucial evidence could have already been destroyed. leland vittert is live in
from russia granting asylum to n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> russia has stabbed us in the back and each day that snowden is allowed to roam free is another twist of the knife. >> schieffer: we'll hear from new york democrat chuck schumer and we'll talk with house budget committee chairman paul ryan. plus analysis from the "washington post's" dan balz, author of the new book "collision 2012." peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." barton gellman of "time" magazine and the "washington post." david sanger of the "new york times," and cbs news political director john dickerson. a lot to cover, but it's what we do on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. well, we're getting more details this morning on why the government has closed those 22 american diplomatic posts across the middle east and north africa, and why they are taking so seriously the threat of a possible al qaeda attack. the travel warning that the state department issued last week for americans travelin
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
. today we are finding out that according to the "wall street journal" that the u.s. government, the nsa is spying on, i don't know what word you want to use, but surveilling 75% of online communications. nsa built a surveillance network than officials have publicly showed. it can reach 75% of all u.s. internet traffic. this is days after the british government destroyed laptops that supposedly had information from edward snowden's files on it. i mean, what are the repercussions of this? >> i want to say one can be disturbed about what was done to glenn greenwald's partner and one can be concerned about the extent that is being revealed by the snowden leaks about nsa leaking. one can be disturbed by all of those things. being disturbed and concerned and the general march towards secrecy does not thereby say and bradley manning should be pardoned or released. i just want to make that clear, that those -- one can be properly concerned about all of those things and think that the snowden effect is more good than bad, but that -- again, i would say that doesn't mean that all bets are off and
childhood. martha: new details on the nsa surveillance program. the "wall street journal" says the nsa can spy on 75 per of all internet traffic. gregg: 75% of all web traffic. that is an enormous number. while it's supposed to only track foreigners. the "wall street journal" revealing the nsa sometimes keeps e-mails sent by u.s. citizens. martha: we have heard a couple of bombshells. how is this story different? >> reporter: the program edward snowden made public called prism is detailed in this morning's "wall street journal" involve pursuant to the requisite court orders the filtering and gathering of information at the major telecoms companies generated exclusionily between and among innocent u.s. citizens. >> the nsa thinks of collection as the related review. acquisition is different from having an analyst review it and that's when the collection takes place. those bizarre definitions allow the nsa to and secure what's going on even though they are saying the right words. >> reporter: americans will be pleasantly surprised to learn that up to 25% of u.s. traffic isn't being collected
. it is the biggest hate crime hoax of the year. and nsa is not only spying on millions of americans but lots of time using expensive resources to keep track of their love lives. and a founding twist and a new department of defense training manual dedicates a extremist behavior is the same that wanted to overthrow british rule. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. this labor day, don't invest in a mattress until you visit a sleep number store. once you experience it, there's no going back. oh, yeah! at our biggest sale of the year, every bed is on sale. queen mattresses now start at just $599. and through labor day only, save 50% on our limited edition memory foam mattress sets. only at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. [ bottle ] ensure®. nutrition inharge™. >> brand new developments in the brutal beating death of a world war ii vet rap. 88-year-old dell better be
and is not different from our concerns about the nsa. it is not different from our concerns about the racial profiling. and now the idea that simply because of someone's class status which is what we're talking about here means you should be fingerprinted and that, just saying we want to do this for the record, we want to do this to prevent crime. he is making a presumption poor people should be kept as a kind of preemptive device so we know eventually you will commit crime and we'll have you on the record then. so it goes against the presumption of innocence. it goes against the 4th amendment and is really stunning he was able to stand up and make that statement. >> my guests, a big thanks to both of you for being with me. don't forget new york police commissioner ray kelly will be david gregory's guest tomorrow on nbc's "meet the press." check your local listings. >>> a witness to history. the fight for civil rights told through the eyes of a black butler in the white house. we are going to talk to the journalist whose reporting inspired the movie and best selling book. >> wow. amazing. thank you so
lawsuits that have been filed on the nsa program. we have congress holding hearings yesterday finally saying, wait a minute, that's not the law i thought i signed including the author of the bill, mr. sensenbrenner. i find it rather troublesome when i find that that white house press be secretary, mr. carney, goes to such lengths to say he's not a human rights act visits, he's not a dissident, and he's not a whistleblower. well, who made him king of the human rights community, right? i think -- >> [inaudible conversations] >> excuse me, i can't let this stand without giving neil mcbride, who has criminally charged snowden -- >> that's why -- >> -- a chance to respond. >> i have to say, i think it's a bad message for us to send for people who decide to take the law into their own hands they're doing a public service. >> can i think when the system has not worked. we have sued seven times to try to get the surveillance program before a proper court. we were kicked out of court. the clapper v. amnesty international where the justice department lawyer said it was a cascade of speculation
of the world. the nsa program is proving its worth yet again. but we need to reevaluate where we're at in light of these threats. sequestration has to be fixed. if this happens a year from now, intelligence community and military will be less capable. afrikom needs to be beefed up. that's where the war is going. we're about to withdraw from afghanistan. i don't want afghanistan to become iraq where we withdraw our troops and the terrorists come back. i appreciate what the administration is doing. they're taging the right approach to this. benghazi was a complete failure. the threats were real there. the reporting was real. and we basically dropped the ball. we've learned from benghazi, thank god, and the administration is doing this right. >> let me ask you, when you look at this map of u.s. embassies that are closed or consulates or missions, 22 of them, most of them across the muslim world, when you hear this global warning to all americans to take care, what do you think that says if the mission is to terrorize. in some sense, you feel like they've already won. >> it is a balance. shutting d
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 221 (some duplicates have been removed)